http://www.tampabay.com/features/humaninterest/article1086984.ece
















St. Petersburg Times series 'For Their Own Good' a Pulitzer Prize finalist
Times staff In Print: Tuesday, April 13, 2010


The St. Petersburg Times' investigation into abuse at the state's oldest reform school was named a finalist on
Monday for the Pulitzer Prize in local reporting.

Reporters
Ben Montgomery and Waveney Ann Moore and photographer Edmund D. Fountain documented the
effects of brutal whippings at the school in the 1950s and '60s in a series called For Their Own Good. They showed
that not only did the abuse occur, but that it was only one chapter in a 100-year history of state-sponsored violence
and neglect. They also showed that in 2009, the school was still a place that broke bones and bloodied noses of
boys in its care. The work was cited by the Pulitzer board for its "dogged reporting and searing storytelling."

The Pulitzers, awarded by Columbia University, are journalism's highest accolade. The Times has won eight
Pulitzers, including two last year.

To read For Their Own Good, go to magazine. tampabay.com.

Another Florida newspaper was named a finalist in investigative reporting. Michael Braga, Chris Davis and Matthew
Doig of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune were finalists for their in-depth reporting and computer analysis that unraveled
$10 billion in suspicious Florida real estate transactions, triggering local and state efforts to curb abuses.


2010 Pulitzer Prize winners announced in journalism
April 12, 2010 at 4:50 pm by Mitch Perry


The big guns in American journalism, the Washington Post and the New York Times, dominated the list of Pulitzer
Prize winners list announced Monday afternoon, taking home seven awards between them.

The Post took home four of the most prestigious awards handed out in the world of reporting, with Anthony Shadid
winning for International Reporting, Gene Weingarten for Feature Writing,  Dance Critic Sarah Kaufman received
the Pulitzer in Criticism, and former Orlando Sentinel reporter and conservative columnist, Kathleen Parker, won for
Commentary, always one of the most debated of choices (Parker is syndicated but joined the Washington Post
Writers Group in 2006).

In the National Reporting category, Matt Richtel and others at the New York Times were winners for their series
called Driven to Distraction on the problems with texting while driving (and other distractions on the road).  

The New York Times story on the Pulitzer’s also lists the finalists, or runners-up.

In the Local Reporting category, the St. Petersburg Times’
Ben Montgomery, Waveney Ann Moore and
photographer
Edmund D. Fountain were listed  “for their dogged reporting and searing storytelling that illuminated
decades of abuse at a Florida reform school for boys and sparked remedial action.”

And in the Investigative Reporting Category, the Sarasota Herald Tribune’s Micheal Braga, Chris Davis and
Matthew Doig get for “their in-depth reporting and computer analysis that unraveled $10 billion in suspicious Florida
real estate transactions, triggering local and state efforts to curb abuses. “

You may recall that last year at this time, the Times won two Pulitzer’s; one for their investigative watch-dog
site/section PolitiFact (which seems to only get bigger and bolder in scope as it’s now fact checking the comments
of newsmakers on ABC’s This Week) and for Lane DeGregory’s story The Girl in the Window.

And although we don’t know him personally, last year several times over at WMNF we were able to speak with David
Leonhardt, the NY Times Economics columnist, who is a fantastic writer/reporter (check him out every Wednesday
in the Times).  He also was named a finalist in the Commentary category today.



http://www.pulitzer.org/citation/2010-Local-Reporting

The 2010 Pulitzer Prize Winners
Local Reporting


For a distinguished example of reporting on significant issues of local concern, demonstrating originality and
community expertise, in print or online or both, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).

Awarded to Raquel Rutledge of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for her penetrating reports on the fraud and abuse
in a child-care program for low-wage working parents that fleeced taxpayers and imperiled children, resulting in a
state and federal crackdown on providers.
milwaukeejslogo.jpg

Finalists

Also nominated as finalists in this category were:
Ben Montgomery, Waveney Ann Moore and photographer
Edmund D. Fountain of the St. Petersburg Times for their dogged reporting and searing storytelling that
illuminated decades of abuse at a Florida reform school for boys and sparked remedial action; and Dave Philipps of
The Gazette, Colorado Springs, for his painstaking stories on the spike in violence within a battered combat
brigade returning to Fort Carson after bloody deployments to Iraq, leading to increased mental health care for
soldiers.
Ben Montgomery
Waveney Ann Moore
Edmund D. Fountain